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Full Version: I Am not Able to Overcome My Wishes (未能自胜也)
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Prince Mâu of Kung-shan spoke to Kan-tsze, saying, 'My body has its place by the streams and near the sea, but my mind dwells at the court of Wei;-- what have you to say to me in the circumstances?' Kan-tsze replied, 'Set the proper value on your life. When one sets the proper value on his life, gain seems to him unimportant.' The prince rejoined, 'I know that, but I am not able to overcome my wishes.'

The reply was, 'If you cannot master yourself in the matter, follow your inclinations so that your spirit may not be dissatisfied. When you cannot master yourself, and try to force yourself where your spirit does not follow, this is what is called doing yourself a double injury; and those who so injure themselves are not among the long-lived.'

Mâu of Wei was the son of a lord of ten thousand chariots. For him to live in retirement among crags and caves was more difficult than for a scholar who had not worn the dress of office. Although he had not attained to the Tâo, he may be said to have had some idea of it.


中山公子牟谓瞻子曰:“身在江海之上,心居乎魏阈之下,奈何?”瞻子曰:“重生。重生则利轻。”中山公子牟曰:“虽知之,未能自胜也。”瞻子曰:“不能自胜则从,神无恶乎?不能自胜而强不从者,此之谓重伤。重伤之人,无寿类矣。”魏牟,万乘之公子也,其隐岩穴也,难为于布衣之士;虽未至乎道,可谓有其意矣!
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